Sunday, February 28, 2010

Which Monastic Order Fits Me Best? The Quiz Says The Carmelites

Folks, I just took one of those new-fangled quizzes regarding what would be my best “monastic” fit – have in mind that I’m married and that vowed monasticism is sort of out of the question for us – and this is the result:

Your charism, or spiritual focus, and that of the Carmelite Order is contemplative prayer. Founded in the 12th century, the Order is considered by the Church to be under the special protection of the Blessed Virgin Mary and thus has a strong Marian devotion. Carmelite t...radition traces the origin of the order to a community of hermits on Mount Carmel that succeeded the schools of the prophets in ancient Israel, and follows the Carmelite Rule of St. Albert. The rule consisted of sixteen articles, which enjoined strict obedience to their prior, residence in individual cells, constancy in prayer, the hearing of Mass every morning in the oratory of the community, vows of poverty and toil, daily silence from vespers until terce the next morning, abstinence from all forms of meat except in cases of severe illness, and fasting from Holy Cross Day (September 14) until the Easter of the following year. They wear the same habit as the Dominicans, except that the cloak was white, and they wear a distinctive garment called a scapular made of two strips of gray cloth, worn on the breast and back, and fastened at the shoulders. Friars differ from monks in that they are called to live the evangelical counsels (vows of poverty, chastity and obedience) in service to a community, rather than through cloistered asceticism and devotion. Whereas monks live cloistered away from the world in a self-sufficient community, friars are supported by donations or other charitable support. Several famous Carmelites include St. Thérèse of Lisieux, St. John of the Cross, Brother Lawrence of the Resurrection, and St. Teresa of Ávila (who formed a new mendicant branch called the Discalced, or Barefoot, Carmelites).

Well, what do you know! May be a tertiary but, no, I’m already a lay Benedictine!

Take the quiz yourself!

- Hat tip to Sancte Pater.

Second Sunday of Lent

Today’s Mass Readings

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Video: The Theotokion - Byzantine Greek Chant

 
This is a sample of Greek Orthodox Byzantine music chanted by nuns in a Monastery of northern Greek Mainland (Hsuxastirio Timiou Prodromou Akritoxoriou Sidirokastrou Serron). The Hymn is an extract from a book called "Theotokario" and it is dedicated to the Most Holy Mother of God (Theotokos, Virgin Mary). It is usually chanted in Greek monasteries during the afternoon (after Vespers). The pictures of the video come from a different monastery of Northern Greece (Giannitsa/Pella, Iera Moni Agiou Georgiou Anudrou).

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Eastern Christian Readings for Great Lent

Folks, this year the dates of Eastern in Eastern and Western Christianity again coincide. So, courtesy of my friend Dave Brown, I want to share with you another Lenten reading list, this one with a distinct Eastern flavor.

- Check this other "Latin-centric" reading list here.

Monday, February 22, 2010

Lent Blogging Slow Down in Effect

Folks, first, I want to welcome all my new subscribers and/or followers. I am honored and deeply humbled that you have added this humble work to your potential reading list. I realize that your choices are in the hundreds, if not in the thousands, and this motivates me to publish the best contents possible consonant with my mission statement.

As it’s my custom, I slow down my blogging output during Lent and when I do blog, I try to be meditative and edifying. During Lent I like to write about things that actually enhances your Lenten practice and helps all of us to profit spiritually from the reading. I also endeavor to avoid controversial subjects, although on occasion something may happen that is so important that I must comment on it, however controversial. But I try my best to avoid that.

The blogging slow down will also affect my “Twittering” in the same way. These will be few and far between. The only unaffected activity will be my sharing of other blog posts from other authors that I find interesting and that I suspect you will also enjoy. You may read the 10 most recently shared items on the right side bar of the blog (for those of you who signed up to the feed or via e-mail and then forgot, it is at http://www.vivificat.org), under the appropriate heading, Theo’s Shared Items.

Of course, you may access and bookmark my shared items page here. You may also follow my entire output from multiple sites via my Google Buzz Profile. You may also bookmark the link and consolidate in a single place all my blog posts, Twitterings, Shared Items, and YouTube favorites.

In fact, during this holy season, I want to return to some multimedia production, in the form of audiovisual lectio divina that I hope would be of spiritual profit to you.

So, please be patient, stay tuned, and thank you for joining Vivificat.

Sunday, February 21, 2010

A Universal Prayer

Attributed to Pope Clement XI

Pope Clement XI Lord, I believe in you: increase my faith.
I trust in you: strengthen my trust.
I love you: let me love you more and more.
I am sorry for my sins: deepen my sorrow.

I worship you as my first beginning,
I long for you as my last end,
I praise you as my constant helper,
And call on you as my loving protector.

Guide me by your wisdom,
Correct me with your justice,
Comfort me with your mercy,
Protect me with your power.

I offer you, Lord, my thoughts: to be fixed on you;
My words: to have you for their theme;
My actions: to reflect my love for you;
My sufferings: to be endured for your greater glory.

I want to do what you ask of me:
In the way you ask,
For as long as you ask,
Because you ask it.

Lord, enlighten my understanding,
Strengthen my will,
Purify my heart,
and make me holy.

Help me to repent of my past sins
And to resist temptation in the future.
Help me to rise above my human weaknesses
And to grow stronger as a Christian.

Let me love you, my Lord and my God,
And see myself as I really am:
A pilgrim in this world,
A Christian called to respect and love
All whose lives I touch,
Those under my authority,
My friends and my enemies.

Help me to conquer anger with gentleness,
Greed by generosity,
Apathy by fervor.
Help me to forget myself
And reach out toward others.

Make me prudent in planning,
Courageous in taking risks.
Make me patient in suffering, unassuming in prosperity.

Keep me, Lord, attentive at prayer,
Temperate in food and drink,
Diligent in my work,
Firm in my good intentions.

Let my conscience be clear,
My conduct without fault,
My speech blameless,
My life well-ordered.
Put me on guard against my human weaknesses.
Let me cherish your love for me,
Keep your law,
And come at last to your salvation.

Teach me to realize that this world is passing,
That my true future is the happiness of heaven,
That life on earth is short,
And the life to come eternal.

Help me to prepare for death
With a proper fear of judgment,
But a greater trust in your goodness.
Lead me safely through death
To the endless joy of heaven.

Grant this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

- Hat tip to A Catholic Life.

First Sunday of Lent

Today’s Mass Readings:

Friday, February 19, 2010

The Prayer of Jesus

Fr. Nicolas Schwizer

Circumstances. The prayer of Jesus – as our own – was not something automatic which He started whenever He wanted. He had to choose the place well: the desert, the solitude of a mountain. He also had to choose the moment, the circumstances which inspired and favored prayer.

In his life which was so full of things to do – as ours is – it was often difficult for him to find the necessary time. So, He then had to get up at dawn or get away at dusk, or he would stay up during the night. At times when He was bothered by the presence of his disciples, He would have them get on the boat and send them to the other side of the lake.

Frequently, Jesus prayed alone. His special relationship to the Father explains this singular way of praying in which not even the most intimate disciples have access to.

Why does He pray? What was that prayer which Jesus tried hard to protect? What did He, the Son of God, have to ask for…..what grace or what assistance?

Let us not think that Jesus prayed to give us a good example! A modern theologian correctly says: “If the prayer of Christ has meaning for us, if it is an example, then it is because it especially has meaning for Him.”

It is the same for all of us, Jesus did not always have the same clarity of conscience nor the same ability to concentrate. He was vulnerable to the impressions and sensitive to the influences. He had the need for recollection in order to think better about what He was thinking and to know better what He knew.

Encounter with the Father. Tired of the people’s unbelief, He would frequently separate himself from the people: “perverse and incredulous people, how long will I have to put up with you?” Or, he was troubled by their hardness of heart…..impatient with their obstinacy and their slowness to understand: “Is your mind closed?” He asked them on one occasion.

Then He would need to calm down…..consult in his interior with the Father to find the true meaning of his mission…..his leniency with the people… his faith in its power of redemption. Then He would return to his own, renewed and serene.

The will of the Father. Jesus knew the temptation He would have with suffering, loneliness, and fear. He needed to express what came spontaneously to his lips: “Father, spare me this hour! Father, if it is possible, spare me this cup!”

Thanks to prayer, Jesus grew deeper and found his true nature. He remembered from whence He came and where He was going. He would again feel as SON and once again united with his Father, He only had one prayer: “Father, your will be done!” It was his best prayer, the culmination of all his prayers.

And we? If we want to know the condition of our Christian life, we only need to look at how we pray.

Perhaps we do not know how to pray. We know how to chat with our friends and companions for hours and hours, but we do not know how to chat with God, not even for a few minutes per day.

The more simple and childlike our prayer is, the more it pleases God. God seeks the simple person who talks to Him like a child to his father. Childlikeness which is the fundamental attitude before God is also the attitude of prayer before God.

Dear brothers and sisters, the great example of Jesus…..of Mary, the prayerful Virgin…..and of the Saints…..wants to challenge us and motivate us to a life of prayer which is more serious, more intense, and deeper.

Questions for reflection

1. Do we choose the place and the time for prayer, and do we give it enough time?

2. Do we take it seriously as the nourishment and breath of the soul?

3. Is our prayer really a personal, spontaneous talking to God?

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Pope St. Leo I - Sermon XXXIX: On Lent I

I. The Benefits of Abstinence Shown by the Example of the Hebrews

Pope St. Leo I The Great In former days, when the people of the Hebrews and all the tribes of Israel were oppressed for their scandalous sins by the grievous tyranny of the Philistines, in order that they might be able to overcome their enemies, as the sacred story declares, they restored their powers of mind and body by the injunction of a fast. For they understood that they had deserved that hard and wretched subjection for their neglect of God's commands, and evil ways, and that it was in vain for them to strive with arms unless they had first withstood their sin. Therefore abstaining from food and drink, they applied the discipline of strict correction to themselves, and in order to conquer their foes, first conquered the allurements of the palate in themselves. And thus it came about that their fierce enemies and cruel taskmasters yielded to them when fasting, whom they had held in subjection when full. And so we too, dearly beloved, who are set in the midst of many oppositions and conflicts, may be cured by a little carefulness, if only we will use the same means. For our case is almost the same as theirs, seeing that, as they were attacked by foes in the flesh so are we chiefly by spiritual enemies. And if we can conquer them by God's grace enabling us to correct our ways, the strength of our bodily enemies also will give way before us, and by our self-amendment we shall weaken those who were rendered formidable to us, not by their own merits but by our shortcomings.

II. Use Lent to Vanquish the Enemy, and Be Thus Preparing for Eastertide

Accordingly, dearly-beloved, that we may be able to overcome all our enemies, let us seek Divine aid by the observance of the heavenly bidding, knowing that we cannot otherwise prevail against our adversaries, unless we prevail against our own selves. For we have many encounters with our own selves: the flesh desires one thing against the spirit, and the spirit another thing against the flesh. And in this disagreement, if the desires of the body be stronger, the mind will disgracefully lose its proper dignity, and it will be most disastrous for that to serve which ought to have ruled. But if the mind, being subject to its Ruler, and delighting in gifts from above, shall have trampled under foot the allurements of earthly pleasure, and shall not have allowed sin to reign in its mortal body, reason will maintain a well-ordered supremacy, and its strongholds no strategy of spiritual wickednesses will cast down: because man has then only true peace and true freedom when the flesh is ruled by the judgment of the mind, and the mind is directed by the will of God. And although this state of preparedness, dearly-beloved, should always be maintained that our ever-watchful foes may be overcome by unceasing diligence, yet now it must be the more anxiously sought for and the more zealously cultivated when the designs of our subtle foes themselves are conducted with keener craft than ever. For knowing that the most hollowed days of Lent are now at hand, in the keeping of which all past slothfulnesses are chastised, all negligences alerted for, they direct all the force of their spite on this one thing, that they who intend to celebrate the Lord's holy Passover may be found unclean in some matter, and that cause of offence may arise where propitiation ought to have been obtained.

III. Fights are Necessary to Prove Our Faith

As we approach then, dearly-beloved, the beginning of Lent, which is a time for the more careful serving of the Lord, because we are, as it were, entering on a kind of contest in good works, let us prepare our souls for fighting with temptations, and understand that the more zealous we are for our salvation, the more determined must be the assaults of our opponents. But "stronger is He that is in us than He that is against us," and through Him are we powerful in whose strength we rely: because it was for this that the Lord allowed Himself to be tempted by the tempter, that we might be taught by His example as well as fortified by His aid. For He conquered the adversary, as ye have heard, by quotations from the law, not by actual strength, that by this very thing He might do greater honour to man, and inflict a greater punishment on the adversary by conquering the enemy of the human race not now as God but as Man. He fought then, therefore, that we too might fight thereafter: He conquered that we too might likewise conquer. For there are no works of power, dearly-beloved, without the trials of temptations, there is no faith without proof, no contest without a foe, no victory without conflict. This life of ours is in the midst of snares, in the midst of battles; if we do not wish to be deceived, we must watch: if we want to overcome, we must fight. And therefore the most wise Solomon says, "My son in approaching the service of God prepare thy soul for temptation." For He being a man full of the wisdom of God, and knowing that the pursuit of religion involves laborious struggles, foreseeing too the danger of the fight, forewarned the intending combatant; lest haply, if the tempter came upon him in his ignorance, he might find him unready and wound him unawares.

IV. The Christian's Armour is Both for Defence and for Attack

So, dearly-beloved, let us who instructed in Divine learning come wittingly to the present contest and strife, hear the Apostle when he says, "for our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this dark world, against spiritual wickedness in heavenly things," and let us not forget that these our enemies feel it is against them all is done that we strive to do for our salvation, and that by the very fact of our seeking after some good thing we are challenging our foes. For this is an old-standing quarrel between us and them fostered by the devil's ill-will, so that they are tortured by our being justified, because they have fallen from those good things to which we, God helping us, are advancing. If, therefore, we are raised, they are prostrated: if we are strengthened, they are weakened. Our cures are their blows, because they are wounded by our wounds' cure. "Stand, therefore," dearly-beloved, as the Apostle says, "having the loins of your mind girt in truth, and your feet shod in the preparation of the gospel of peace, in all things taking the shield of faith in which ye may be able to extinguish all the fiery darts of the evil one, and put on the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God." See, dearly-beloved, with what mighty weapons, with what impregnable defences we are armed by our Leader, who is famous for His many triumphs, the unconquered Master of the Christian warfare. He has girt our loins with the belt of chastity, He has shod our feet with the bonds of peace: because the unbelted soldier is quickly vanquished by the suggester of immodesty, and he that is unshod is easily bitten by the serpent. He has given the shield of faith for the protection of our whole body; on our head has He set the helmet of salvation; our right hand has He furnished with a sword, that is with the word of Truth: that the spiritual warrior may not only be safe from wounds, but also may have strength to wound his assailant.

V. Abstinence Not Only from Food But from Other Evil Desires, Especially from Wrath, is Required in Lent

Relying, therefore, dearly-beloved, on these arms, let us enter actively and fearlessly on the contest set before us: so that in this fasting struggle we may not rest satisfied with only this end, that we should think abstinence from food alone desirable. For it is not enough that the substance of our flesh should be reduced, if the strength of the soul be not also developed. When the outer man is somewhat subdued, let the inner man be somewhat refreshed; and when bodily excess is denied to our flesh, let our mind be invigorated by spiritual delights. Let every Christian scrutinise himself, and earth severely into his inmost heart: let him see that no discord cling there, no wrong desire be harboured. Let chasteness drive incontinence far away; let the light of truth dispel the shades of deception; let the swellings of pride subside; let wrath yield to reason; let the darts of ill-treatment be shattered, and the chidings of the tongue be bridled; let thoughts of revenge fall through, and injuries be given over to oblivion. In fine, let "every plant which the heavenly Father hath not planted be removed by the roots." For then only are the seeds of virtue well nourished in us, when every foreign germ is uprooted from the field of wheat. If any one, therefore, has been fired by the desire for vengeance against another, so that he has given him up to prison or bound him with chains, let him make haste to forgive not only the innocent, but also one who seems worthy of punishment, that he may with confidence make use of the clause in the Lord's prayer and say, "Forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors." Which petition the Lord marks with peculiar emphasis, as if the efficacy of the whole rested on this condition, by saying, "For if ye forgive men their sins, your Father which is in heaven also will forgive you: but if ye forgive not men, neither will your Father forgive you your Sins."

VI. The Right Use of Lent Will Lead to a Happy Participation in Easter

Accordingly, dearly-beloved, being mindful of our weakness, because we easily fall into all kinds of faults, let us by no means neglect this special remedy and most effectual healing of our wounds. Let us remit, that we may have remission: let us grant the pardon which we crave: let us not be eager to be revenged when we pray to be forgiven. Let us not pass over the groans of the poor with deaf ear, but with prompt kindness bestow our mercy on the needy, that we may deserve to find mercy in the judgment. And he that, aided by God's grace, shall strain every nerve after this perfection, will keep this holy fast faithfully; free from the leaven of the old wickedness, in the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth11 , he will reach the blessed Passover, and by newness of life will worthily rejoice in the mystery of man's reformation through Christ our Lord Who with the Father and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.

This sermon was delivered during the Lenten Fast. Lent is the Fast leading up to Easter. Translation of sermon from Nicene and Post Nicene Fathers, Second Series: Vol. XII.

Source: Ancient and Future Catholic Sermons

Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Haiku for Ash Wednesday

 Ashes remind us

of the Paschal full moon rise -

and of our own dusk

Monday, February 15, 2010

Holy See Clarifies Freedom to Celebrate the Liturgical Usus Antiquor

The Pontifical Commission Ecclesia Dei has recently answered some important questions regarding the application of the motu proprio Summorum Pontificum submitted by the moderator for the faithful attached to the Extraordinary Form of the diocese of Rzeszów, Poland. The answers, however, are applicable generally. The original questions (in German) and answers (in Italian), published by Nowy Ruch Liturgiczny are reproduced below. Here is an NLM summary; questions 2 and 3 have easily the biggest impact:

1. If there is no other possibility, because for instance in all churches of a diocese the liturgies of the Sacred Triduum are already being celebrated in the Ordinary Form, the liturgies of the Sacred Triduum may, in the same church in which they are already celebrated in the Ordinary Form, be additionally celebrated in the Extraordinary Form, if the local ordinary allows.

2. A Mass in the usus antiquior may replace a regularly scheduled Mass in the Ordinary Form. The question contextualizes that in many churches Sunday Masses are more or less scheduled continually, leaving free only very incovenient mid afternoon slots, but this is merely context, the question posed being general. The answer leaves the matter to the prudent judgement of the parish priest, and emphasises the right of a stable group to assist at Mass in the Extraordinary Form.

3. A parish priest may schedule a public Mass in the Extraordinary Form on his own accord (i.e. without the request of a group of faithful) for the benefit of the faithful including those unfamiliar with the usus antiquior. The response of the Commission here is identical to no. 2.

4. The calendar, readings or prefaces of the 1970 Missale Romanum may not be substituted for those of the 1962 Missale Romanum in Masses in the Extraordinary Form.

5. While the liturgical readings (Epistle and Gospel) themselves have to be read by the priest (or deacon/subdeacon) as foreseen by the rubrics, a translation to the vernacular may afterwards be read also by a layman.

Hat tip to Gregor Kollmorgen at The New Liturgical Movement.

Plenty of Good Reading for Lent at Your Fingertips

Folks, I am mirror-imaging the table of contents of  Saints' Books for your edification and sanctification. To download a book please right click on the link and choose the option to 'Save Link As' or 'Save Target As' then choose the folder on your computer, normally the desktop, where you wish to have the downloaded book for future reading. Please refrain from downloading more than one book at a time, but download as many books total as you please. If you have difficulties downloading there is a troubleshooting guide. The books are provided free of charge. Please consider making a donation, here.

I haven’t read all these works, by the way, but I’m more likely to agree with the works of saints or of popes and bishops. The rest may represent the individual theological opinions of the authors, in whole or in part, with which I may agree or not – in whole or in part.

General Works of the Saints

St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Incarnation, Birth, and Infancy of Jesus Christ Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Preparation for Death Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Holy Eucharist Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The True Spouse of Jesus Christ Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Glories of Mary Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Way of Salvation and Perfection Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Uniformity with God's Will Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Victories of the Martyrs Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Holy Mass Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Miscellany Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Letters Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Letters II Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Letters III Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Letters IV Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Letters V Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The History of Heresies and Their Refutation Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - The Passion and the Death of Jesus Christ Download PDF    
   
St. Albert the Great - On Cleaving to God Download PDF    
   
St. Ambrose of Milan - Concerning Virginity Download PDF    
   
St. Anselm of Canterbury - Cur Deus Homo - 'Why God Became Man' Download PDF    
St. Anselm of Canterbury - The Devotions of Download PDF    
   
St. Anthony Mary Claret - Autobiography Download PDF    
   
St. Anthony of Padua - The Sermons Download PDF    
   
St. Augustine - Enchiridion on Faith, Hope, and Love Download PDF    
   
St. Bernard of Clairvaux - On Loving God Download PDF    
   
St. Bonaventure - Mirror of the Blessed Virgin Mary Download PDF    
St. Bonaventure - The Mind's Road to God Download PDF    
St. Bonaventure - Psalter of the Blessed Virgin Mary Download PDF    
   
St. Bridget of Sweden - Prophecies and Revelations Download PDF    
   
St. Catherine of Bologna - The Seven Spiritual Weapons Download TXT    
   
St. Catherine of Genoa - Life and Doctrine Download PDF    
   
St. Catherine of Siena - The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin Download PDF    
   
St. Elizabeth of Toss - The Revelations of Download DOC     Download HTML
   
St. Faustina Kowalska - Diary Download PDF    
   
St. Francis de Sales - Introduction to the Devout Life Download PDF    
St. Francis de Sales - Mystical Flora or the Christian Life under the Emblem of Plants Download PDF    
St. Francis de Sales - Treastise on the Love of God Download PDF    
   
St. Francis of Assisi - Writings Download PDF    
   
St. Gertrude the Great - The Exercises Download PDF    
St. Gertrude the Great - The Love of the Heart of Jesus to His Creatures Download PDF    
   
St. Ignatius of Loyola - A Thought from for Each Day of the Year Download PDF    
St. Ignatius of Loyola - Letters and Instructions Download PDF    
St. Ignatius of Loyola - The Autobiography of Download PDF    
St. Ignatius of Loyola - The Spiritual Exercises Download PDF    
   
St. John of Avila - The Letters of Download PDF    
   
St. John of the Cross - Ascent of Mount Carmel Download PDF    
St. John of the Cross - Dark Night of the Soul Download PDF    
St. John of the Cross - A Spiritual Canticle of the Soul Download PDF    
St. John of the Cross - The Living Flame of Love Download PDF    
   
St. Leonard of Port Maurice - The Little Number of Those Who Are Saved Download HTML    
St. Leonard of Port Maurice - The Hidden Treasure or the Immense Excellence of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass Download PDF    
   
St. Louis Marie de Montfort - Letter to the Friends of the Cross Download PDF    
St. Louis Marie de Montfort - The Secret of Mary Download PDF    
St. Louis Marie de Montfort - The Secret of the Rosary Download PDF    
St. Louis Marie de Montfort - True Devotion to Mary Download PDF    
   
St. Margaret Mary Alacoque - Letters Download PDF    
   
Bl. Pope Pius IX - The Syllabus of Errors Download RTF    
   
St. Pope Pius X - Pascendi Dominici Gregis - On the Doctrine of the Modernists Download PDF    
   
St. Teresa of Avila - The Life of by Herself Download PDF    
St. Teresa of Avila - The Way of Perfection Download PDF    
St. Teresa of Avila - The Interior Castle or The Mansions - Including Some of Her More Interesting Letters Download PDF    
   
St. Thomas Aquinas - The Summa Contra Gentiles - Of God and His Creatures Download PDF    
   
Ven. Louis of Granada - A Memorial of a Christian Life Download PDF    
Ven. Louis of Granada - The Sinner's Guide Download PDF    

References

The Baltimore Catechism #1 Download PDF    
The Baltimore Catechism #2 Download PDF    
The Baltimore Catechism #3 Download TXT    
The Baltimore Catechism #4 Download PDF    
   
The Catechetical Instructions of St. Thomas Aquinas Download PDF    
   
The Catechism of Pope St. Pius X Download TXT
   
The Code of Canon Law - 1917 [Latin] Download TXT
   
The Clementine Vulgate Download PDF    
   
The Douay Catechism of 1649 Download PDF    
   
The Douay-Rheims Bible Download PDF    
   
The Enchiridion of Indulgences Download PDF    
   
The Raccolta Download PDF    
   
The Roman Catechism (or the Catechism of the Council of Trent, or the Catechism of St. Pius V) Download PDF    
   
The Roman Ritual - Volume 1 Download TXT    
The Roman Ritual - Volume 2 Download TXT    

Priests' Manuals & Works of Instruction

   
Fr. Joseph Frassinetti - The New Parish Priest's Practical Manual Download PDF    
   
Prof. Caspar E. Schieler, D.D. - Theory and Practice of the Confessional Download PDF    
   
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Dignity and Duties of a Priest Download PDF    

Material for Sermons

Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Christian State of Life - Vol. 1 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Christian State of Life - Vol. 2 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Bad Christian - Vol. 3 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Bad Christian - Vol. 4 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Penitent Christian - Vol. 5 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Penitent Christian - Vol. 6 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Good Christian - Vol. 7 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - The Good Christian - Vol. 8 Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - Our Lord, the Blessed Mother and the Saints Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - Our Lord, the Blessed Mother and the Saints - II Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - Penance Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Christian Virtues Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Christian Virtues - II Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Different States in Life Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Four Last Things Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Four Last Things - II Download PDF    
Fr. Francis Hunolt - Sermons - Adapted to All Sundays - The Seven Deadly Sins Download PDF    
   
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Pulpit Themes Download PDF    
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Short Sermons Download PDF    
   
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Sermons for All Sundays of the Year Download PDF    
St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori - Sermons Upon Various Subjects Download PDF    
   
St. Thomas Aquinas - Homilies for the Sundays Download PDF    

Scripture Commentary

Bishop Friedrich Knecht - A Practical Commentary on Holy Scripture Download PDF    
   
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 1 - St. Matthew's Gospel - Chapters 1-9 Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 2 - St. Matthew's Gospel - Chapters 10-21 Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 3 - St. Matthew's Gospel - Chapters 22-28 and St. Mark's Gospel Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 4 - St. Luke's Gospel Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 5 - St. John's Gospel - Chapters 1 to 11 Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 6 - St. John's Gospel - Chapters 12-21 and Epistles 1-3 Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 7 - 1 Corinthians Download PDF    
Cornelius a Lapide - The Great Commentary - 8 - 2 Corinthians and Galatians Download PDF    
   
Fr. George Leo Haydock - Old Testament Commentary Download RTF
Fr. George Leo Haydock - New Testament Commentary Download RTF
   
St. Thomas Aquinas - Catena Aurea - 1 - The Gospel of Matthew - A Commentary on the Gospel Download PDF    
St. Thomas Aquinas - Catena Aurea - 2 - The Gospel of Mark - A Commentary on the Gospel Download PDF    
St. Thomas Aquinas - Catena Aurea - 3 - The Gospel of Luke - A Commentary on the Gospel Download PDF    
St. Thomas Aquinas - Catena Aurea - 4 - The Gospel of John - A Commentary on the Gospel Download PDF    

Meditation

Anonymous - Considerations and Devout Meditations for Every Day During the Holy Season of Lent Download PDF    
Anonymous - Flowers of Mary Download PDF    
Anonymous - Meditations for Advent and Easter Download PDF    
   
Rev. John Wyse - Devout Exercises - Meditations and Visits to the Sanctuaries of the Blessed Virgin Download PDF    

Misc. Works

Anonymous - The Golden Manual Download PDF    
   
Benzinger Brothers - Catalogue of Vestments, Banners and Regalia Download PDF    
   
Bishop George Hay - The Sincere Christian - Vol. 1 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - The Sincere Christian - Vol. 2 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - The Devout Christian - Vol. 3 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - The Devout Christian - Vol. 4 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - The Pious Christian - Vol. 5 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - On Miracles - Vol. 6 Download PDF    
Bishop George Hay - On Miracles - Vol. 7 Download PDF    
   
Dr. Don Felix Sarda Y. Salvany - Liberalism is a Sin Download RTF     Download HTML
   
Edward H. Thompson - The Life and Glories of St. Joseph Download PDF    
Edward H. Thompson - The Life of St. Stanislas Kostka Download PDF    
   
Fr. Adrian Fortescue - Donatism Download PDF    
Fr. Adrian Fortescue - The Greek Fathers Download PDF    
Fr. Adrian Fortescue - The Lesser Eastern Churches Download PDF    
Fr. Adrian Fortescue - The Orthodox Eastern Church Download PDF    
   
Fr. F.X. Lasance - Blessed Sacrament Book Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - The Catholic Girl's Guide Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - My Prayer Book Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - Prayer Book for Religious Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - Thoughts on the Religious Life Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - Visits to Jesus in the Tabernacle Download PDF    
Fr. F.X. Lasance - With God - A Book of Prayers & Reflections Download PDF    
   
Fr. Jean Pierre de Caussade, S.J. - Abandonment to Divine Providence Download PDF    
   
Fr. John Furniss - The Sight of Hell Download RTF    
   
Fr. Henry Joseph Pflugbeil - St. Thomas Manual Download PDF    
   
Fr. Martin Cochem - Explanation of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass Download PDF    
   
Fr. Paul O'Sullivan, O.P. - Read Me or Rue It Download PDF    
   
Francis S. Betten, S.J. - The Roman Index of Forbidden Books Download PDF    
   
Henri Marie Bouden - Devotion to the Nine Choirs of Holy Angels Download PDF    
Henri Marie Bouden - The Holy Ways of the Cross Download PDF    
   
J.K. Huysmans - St. Lydwine of Schiedam Download PDF    
   
Joseph A. Keller - Miracles of St. Anthony of Padua Download RTF
   
Rev. Alexis M. Lepicier, O.S.M. - The Fairest Flower of Paradise Download PDF    
   
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Abridged Course of Religious Instruction Download PDF    
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - An Easy Method of Meditation Download PDF    
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Purgatory Download PDF    
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Hell Download RTF
Rev. F.X. Schouppe, S.J. - Sodality Director's Manual Download PDF    
   
Rev. J.B. Scheurer - Sermons on the Blessed Sacrament and Especially for the Fourty Hours Download PDF
   
Rev. Paschal Robinson - The Golden Sayings of the Blessed Brother Giles of Assisi Download PDF
   
The Count of Montelembert - Life of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary Download PDF
   
The Rural Life Prayerbook Download TXT
   
Thomas a Kempis - The Imitation of Christ Download PDF    
   
Thomas A. Nelson - Which Bible Should You Read? Download PDF